An Overview of colorist control surfaces. Announcing a new series of tutorials.

Round-up: Colorist Control Surfaces


Patrick Inhofer

An Overview: Colorist Control Surfaces

This blog post is the official kick-off announcement for a new series of Insights here on MixingLight! For the next few weeks we are talking colorist control surfaces!

Patrick and Robbie (both self-confessed colorist control surface junkies)  recorded several segments in the studio – presenting an overview of three major control surfaces. Patrick then takes you into his color grading suite, showing you how he sets them up… finally taking each surface on a spin through a few color correction apps.

The Round-up

This round-up series on colorist controls surfaces will feature:

We are kicking off this series with an in-depth look at the Tangent Element colorist control surface.

Video: Why Use Colorist Control Surface?

The video below is our introductory video to this series. Patrick and Robbie discuss the benefits of color correcting with a control surface. Some of those benefits include:

  • Work faster by developing muscle memory
  • Manipulate several controls simultaneously
  • Maintain your focus on the image

Diary: Moving to a Colorist Control Surface

Several years ago, on his company’s website, Patrick kept an online diary when he first moved off the mouse and onto a control surface. He wanted to document what benefits, if any, he saw when grading with a control surface. Read the color correction diary, Controlling Apple Color,  about his initial experiences using a colorist control surface.

You’ll be able to find the videos in this series over in our Insights Library. We’ll update this post with links to those Insights as they are released over the coming weeks.

The Series

The first Insight in this series has been released! After watching the Overview video below, click through to watch the first in this series:

[spacer height=”2em”]

PHNjcmlwdCB0eXBlPSJ0ZXh0L2phdmFzY3JpcHQiIHNyYz0iaHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubWl4aW5nbGlnaHQuY29tL2V2cy9wbGF5ZXIvP2lkPVRXbDRhVzVuVEdsbmFIUmZRMjl1ZEhKdmJGTjFjbVpoWTJWelgwOTJaWEoyYVdWM05DNXRjRFElM0QmY29udGFpbmVyPWV2cC0zTVc4Q0JSM0oxIj48L3NjcmlwdD48ZGl2IGlkPSJldnAtM01XOENCUjNKMSIgZGF0YS1yb2xlPSJldnAtdmlkZW8iIGRhdGEtZXZwLWlkPSJUV2w0YVc1blRHbG5hSFJmUTI5dWRISnZiRk4xY21aaFkyVnpYMDkyWlhKMmFXVjNOQzV0Y0RRPSI+PC9kaXY+

Comments

10 thoughts on “Round-up: Colorist Control Surfaces”

  1. I get it now and see what you were talking about earlier — regarding a different content topic. Two people can be more compelling and you can cover greater nuance in the subject matter.

  2. Please talk about the lack of a power window “invert” button on the Tangent Element. We need to get Davinci to map this button for us, it’s getting ridiculous!

      1. I definitely have contacted them over that. There are tons of features that I would love for that panel to have, but the invert button is definitely one of my most used buttons. I was shocked when I upgraded from the Wave to the Element and found out it was missing.

  3. Patrick, I know you used to use the JLCooper Eclipse, which is what I’ve got. I’m wondering if you consider the Elements a significant improvement worth the upgrade. (I work in Resolve.)

    1. The Element is a big improvement, in my mind, because it’s the one that the DaVinci team is most inclined to update the mappings. Also, in Resolve 10 & 11 the one-button ‘Add Node + CPW’ shortcuts have all been removed from the Eclipse making it dramatically slower to use.

      1. Thanks for the reply. I’ve got node+CPW, as well as lots of other things mapped onto a 64-button Novation Launchpad, so I hadn’t noticed they’d dropped it from the Eclipse. Is there anything you miss from the Eclipse?

Leave a Reply

Loading...