Saving The Day With Input Sizing in DaVinci Resolve

Saving The Day With Input Sizing in DaVinci Resolve

January 24, 2017

If you're having trouble with you sizing in Premiere Pro not being replicated in DaVinci Resolve, the Input Sizing control may be your hero.


Series
Day 23: 25 Insights in 25 Days New Year’s Marathon

Saving the Day with Input Sizing in DaVinci Resolve

Premiere Pro Detective, Part 4: Reconforming ‘In The Shadow Of Giants’ with What We’ve Learned

We are closing out this Premiere Pro Detective series by revisiting a short film from another series, ‘Conforming Giants‘. In that series, I ran into a ton of problems with resizes of 2.5K and larger images not properly importing in DaVinci Resolve. I didn’t follow the rules outlined in this series and wasted a ton of time.

Let’s go back to that project, and re-do it with what we now know

In the process, I’ll show you a very handy trick using DaVinci Resolve’s ‘Input Sizing’ to help you handle tricky conforms. This Insight features me only apply this tip to one set of images, the 5k clips. But you want to repeat this tip for each of the oversized frame formats since each of them will require a different Input Scaling number.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series and found it useful.

Be sure to use the comments to share thoughts, feedback or ask questions.

-pi

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Homepage Forums Saving The Day With Input Sizing in DaVinci Resolve

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    • It would be nice if someone wrote a new plugin for premiere that exports the timelines in a resolve friendly manner. Maybe something that converts the easing math, title, sizing etc.

      Resolve can use some more clip sub filters in the edit index to filter by clips with transforms and key frames to make this process easier to verify.

    • It would be nice if someone wrote a new plugin for premiere that exports the timelines in a resolve friendly manner. Maybe something that converts the easing math, title, sizing etc.

      Resolve can use some more clip sub filters in the edit index to filter by clips with transforms and key frames to make this process easier to verify.

    • It would be nice if someone wrote a new plugin for premiere that exports the timelines in a resolve friendly manner. Maybe something that converts the easing math, title, sizing etc.

      Resolve can use some more clip sub filters in the edit index to filter by clips with transforms and key frames to make this process easier to verify.


    • andi winter
      Participant

      thank you very much patrick!!! the whole series makes totally sense and will be a huge time saver at the next premiere pro project. most of my projects are avid based (yippie!) but of course premiere projects drop in from time to time, as well as finalcutx.

      so, thanks again, i know this investigation stuff takes time and patience 🙂


    • andi winter
      Participant

      thank you very much patrick!!! the whole series makes totally sense and will be a huge time saver at the next premiere pro project. most of my projects are avid based (yippie!) but of course premiere projects drop in from time to time, as well as finalcutx.

      so, thanks again, i know this investigation stuff takes time and patience 🙂


    • andi winter
      Participant

      thank you very much patrick!!! the whole series makes totally sense and will be a huge time saver at the next premiere pro project. most of my projects are avid based (yippie!) but of course premiere projects drop in from time to time, as well as finalcutx.

      so, thanks again, i know this investigation stuff takes time and patience 🙂


    • Christophe Delaunay
      Participant

      I’m not sure to understand the last part with 5K clips and the Input Sizing. Of course I see the numbers are working well. But this part is going fast: could you explain how you’ve managed to reverse-engineer the thing? Thank you.


    • Christophe Delaunay
      Participant

      I’m not sure to understand the last part with 5K clips and the Input Sizing. Of course I see the numbers are working well. But this part is going fast: could you explain how you’ve managed to reverse-engineer the thing? Thank you.


    • Christophe Delaunay
      Participant

      I’m not sure to understand the last part with 5K clips and the Input Sizing. Of course I see the numbers are working well. But this part is going fast: could you explain how you’ve managed to reverse-engineer the thing? Thank you.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      When two conditions are met: The oversized frame is ‘Set to Frame Size’ in Premiere Pro + Resolve is doing a ‘Center Crop with no Scaling’, the incoming footage will be shrunk in DaVinci Resolve. In the example in this video, it’s shrunk to 31.3% in Premeire for it to fit perfectly into a 1920 x 1080 frame.

      Using input sizing, we can assign every one of those oversized shots to be blown up so that when it is shrunk back down by that 31.3% factor, it’ll perfectly fit the 1080 frame. To find that number we need to figure out how much to blow up the image. It turns out the rough math is simple, just move PrPro’s decimal point one to the left and punch that as your zoom factor when creating your Input Sizing preset. In this case, the zoom number is: 3.13.

      But that’s the rough math and I was off a bit in the video (I was wrong where I stated the mismatch in sizing was due to motion blur). The precise math is:

      1/(PrPro scale factor)=(Resolve Input sizing zoom number)

      In my example: 1/31.3% or 1/.313 = 3.194

      So the number I should have entered in Resolve for the Input Sizing Scaling is 3.194 and that should give me the perfect zoom factor to offset the Premiere Pro’s Scale factor.

      I just wrapped a paying job today where this came into play for the entire timeline and I’m working on getting permission to show this in action; you’re right, I zipped through that bit pretty quick.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      When two conditions are met: The oversized frame is ‘Set to Frame Size’ in Premiere Pro + Resolve is doing a ‘Center Crop with no Scaling’, the incoming footage will be shrunk in DaVinci Resolve. In the example in this video, it’s shrunk to 31.3% in Premeire for it to fit perfectly into a 1920 x 1080 frame.

      Using input sizing, we can assign every one of those oversized shots to be blown up so that when it is shrunk back down by that 31.3% factor, it’ll perfectly fit the 1080 frame. To find that number we need to figure out how much to blow up the image. It turns out the rough math is simple, just move PrPro’s decimal point one to the left and punch that as your zoom factor when creating your Input Sizing preset. In this case, the zoom number is: 3.13.

      But that’s the rough math and I was off a bit in the video (I was wrong where I stated the mismatch in sizing was due to motion blur). The precise math is:

      1/(PrPro scale factor)=(Resolve Input sizing zoom number)

      In my example: 1/31.3% or 1/.313 = 3.194

      So the number I should have entered in Resolve for the Input Sizing Scaling is 3.194 and that should give me the perfect zoom factor to offset the Premiere Pro’s Scale factor.

      I just wrapped a paying job today where this came into play for the entire timeline and I’m working on getting permission to show this in action; you’re right, I zipped through that bit pretty quick.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      When two conditions are met: The oversized frame is ‘Set to Frame Size’ in Premiere Pro + Resolve is doing a ‘Center Crop with no Scaling’, the incoming footage will be shrunk in DaVinci Resolve. In the example in this video, it’s shrunk to 31.3% in Premeire for it to fit perfectly into a 1920 x 1080 frame.

      Using input sizing, we can assign every one of those oversized shots to be blown up so that when it is shrunk back down by that 31.3% factor, it’ll perfectly fit the 1080 frame. To find that number we need to figure out how much to blow up the image. It turns out the rough math is simple, just move PrPro’s decimal point one to the left and punch that as your zoom factor when creating your Input Sizing preset. In this case, the zoom number is: 3.13.

      But that’s the rough math and I was off a bit in the video (I was wrong where I stated the mismatch in sizing was due to motion blur). The precise math is:

      1/(PrPro scale factor)=(Resolve Input sizing zoom number)

      In my example: 1/31.3% or 1/.313 = 3.194

      So the number I should have entered in Resolve for the Input Sizing Scaling is 3.194 and that should give me the perfect zoom factor to offset the Premiere Pro’s Scale factor.

      I just wrapped a paying job today where this came into play for the entire timeline and I’m working on getting permission to show this in action; you’re right, I zipped through that bit pretty quick.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      You’re very welcome. I love that Mixing Light gives me the excuse to take the time to figure this stuff out. Always learning… (and then teaching).


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      You’re very welcome. I love that Mixing Light gives me the excuse to take the time to figure this stuff out. Always learning… (and then teaching).


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      You’re very welcome. I love that Mixing Light gives me the excuse to take the time to figure this stuff out. Always learning… (and then teaching).


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I’ve been thinking the same thing – more edit index filters for clips with Transforms, Crops, Keyframes would all be very welcome enhancements.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I’ve been thinking the same thing – more edit index filters for clips with Transforms, Crops, Keyframes would all be very welcome enhancements.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I’ve been thinking the same thing – more edit index filters for clips with Transforms, Crops, Keyframes would all be very welcome enhancements.


    • Christophe Delaunay
      Participant

      Thanks for the detailed answer, way easier now. 🙂


    • Christophe Delaunay
      Participant

      Thanks for the detailed answer, way easier now. 🙂


    • Christophe Delaunay
      Participant

      Thanks for the detailed answer, way easier now. 🙂


    • Greyson A
      Participant

      Anamorphic footage adds an interesting layer to this conversation. This particular situation arose while conforming 2944×2160 anamorphic Alexa footage to a 1920x1080p XML timeline. The editor used Premiere Pro and scaled the clips manually. He did not use either “Set to Frame Size” or “Scale to Frame Size” from what I can tell. The clip I am referencing below was scaled at 0.400 with adjusted X & Y positioning upon XML import. The reference video is at 50% opacity.

      With “center crop with no resizing” and the Clip Attributes changed to Cinemascope, I got an improperly scaled but correct aspect ratio clip straight from the XML.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/77576b2a8ed522dee40fc3cf773234e95fc126f8062cb51916741993e78941ad.jpg

      Unfortunately, manually moving the the X & Y scale up to .800 to match the frame came out as below. The X & Y positioning is completely off.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c3bca8878ef6da07408ed2691909e13956d5aab7acc39e32634b4d3dbab6959a.jpg

      To experiment, I switched the “Cinemascope” setting under Clip Attributes back to “Square” and arrived at the image below. The result was a perfectly Y scale image, but squeezed X.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/172f9079050e3cce961bc9a68976881dbcfcd8b1d3c19b99fd99624da27bc57a.jpg

      With the Y zoom at the original .400, I took the X zoom and began to drag it out to match the reference video. It matched perfectly at .800, which is to be expected with anamorphic footage! However, this method perfectly matched the X&Y positioning, unlike my initial attempt at simply increasing the zoom.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4cc38f50ad1eed051503a38d2fe1a545ea7ddea9292c8faaf587bde0a0b0619e.jpg

      I was profoundly frustrated when both variables on the Premiere & Resolve sides were as this insight suggested, yet my footage still did not line up. Turns out, the “Cinemascope” Clip Attribute setting can mess the scaling up as well. The solution was to make the Clip Attribute to “Square” and manually adjusted the X zoom to be double of the Y zoom.

      As a side note, I even had a clip where the editor manually keyframed both scaling and X&Y position adjustments and this solution worked.

      If anyone has a better idea than manually adjusting or recognized that my settings were off, please comment! Working with anamorphic footage adds another potentially confusing layer to the conform process.


    • Greyson A
      Participant

      Anamorphic footage adds an interesting layer to this conversation. This particular situation arose while conforming 2944×2160 anamorphic Alexa footage to a 1920x1080p XML timeline. The editor used Premiere Pro and scaled the clips manually. He did not use either “Set to Frame Size” or “Scale to Frame Size” from what I can tell. The clip I am referencing below was scaled at 0.400 with adjusted X & Y positioning upon XML import. The reference video is at 50% opacity.

      With “center crop with no resizing” and the Clip Attributes changed to Cinemascope, I got an improperly scaled but correct aspect ratio clip straight from the XML.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/77576b2a8ed522dee40fc3cf773234e95fc126f8062cb51916741993e78941ad.jpg

      Unfortunately, manually moving the the X & Y scale up to .800 to match the frame came out as below. The X & Y positioning is completely off.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c3bca8878ef6da07408ed2691909e13956d5aab7acc39e32634b4d3dbab6959a.jpg

      To experiment, I switched the “Cinemascope” setting under Clip Attributes back to “Square” and arrived at the image below. The result was a perfectly Y scale image, but squeezed X.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/172f9079050e3cce961bc9a68976881dbcfcd8b1d3c19b99fd99624da27bc57a.jpg

      With the Y zoom at the original .400, I took the X zoom and began to drag it out to match the reference video. It matched perfectly at .800, which is to be expected with anamorphic footage! However, this method perfectly matched the X&Y positioning, unlike my initial attempt at simply increasing the zoom.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4cc38f50ad1eed051503a38d2fe1a545ea7ddea9292c8faaf587bde0a0b0619e.jpg

      I was profoundly frustrated when both variables on the Premiere & Resolve sides were as this insight suggested, yet my footage still did not line up. Turns out, the “Cinemascope” Clip Attribute setting can mess the scaling up as well. The solution was to make the Clip Attribute to “Square” and manually adjusted the X zoom to be double of the Y zoom.

      As a side note, I even had a clip where the editor manually keyframed both scaling and X&Y position adjustments and this solution worked.

      If anyone has a better idea than manually adjusting or recognized that my settings were off, please comment! Working with anamorphic footage adds another potentially confusing layer to the conform process.


    • Greyson A
      Participant

      Anamorphic footage adds an interesting layer to this conversation. This particular situation arose while conforming 2944×2160 anamorphic Alexa footage to a 1920x1080p XML timeline. The editor used Premiere Pro and scaled the clips manually. He did not use either “Set to Frame Size” or “Scale to Frame Size” from what I can tell. The clip I am referencing below was scaled at 0.400 with adjusted X & Y positioning upon XML import. The reference video is at 50% opacity.

      With “center crop with no resizing” and the Clip Attributes changed to Cinemascope, I got an improperly scaled but correct aspect ratio clip straight from the XML.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/77576b2a8ed522dee40fc3cf773234e95fc126f8062cb51916741993e78941ad.jpg

      Unfortunately, manually moving the the X & Y scale up to .800 to match the frame came out as below. The X & Y positioning is completely off.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c3bca8878ef6da07408ed2691909e13956d5aab7acc39e32634b4d3dbab6959a.jpg

      To experiment, I switched the “Cinemascope” setting under Clip Attributes back to “Square” and arrived at the image below. The result was a perfectly Y scale image, but squeezed X.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/172f9079050e3cce961bc9a68976881dbcfcd8b1d3c19b99fd99624da27bc57a.jpg

      With the Y zoom at the original .400, I took the X zoom and began to drag it out to match the reference video. It matched perfectly at .800, which is to be expected with anamorphic footage! However, this method perfectly matched the X&Y positioning, unlike my initial attempt at simply increasing the zoom.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4cc38f50ad1eed051503a38d2fe1a545ea7ddea9292c8faaf587bde0a0b0619e.jpg

      I was profoundly frustrated when both variables on the Premiere & Resolve sides were as this insight suggested, yet my footage still did not line up. Turns out, the “Cinemascope” Clip Attribute setting can mess the scaling up as well. The solution was to make the Clip Attribute to “Square” and manually adjusted the X zoom to be double of the Y zoom.

      As a side note, I even had a clip where the editor manually keyframed both scaling and X&Y position adjustments and this solution worked.

      If anyone has a better idea than manually adjusting or recognized that my settings were off, please comment! Working with anamorphic footage adds another potentially confusing layer to the conform process.


    • R.NeilHaugen
      Guest

      Slick … and thanks, Patrick!


    • R.NeilHaugen
      Guest

      Slick … and thanks, Patrick!


    • R.NeilHaugen
      Guest

      Slick … and thanks, Patrick!


    • David H
      Member

      This is great info, Patrick, thank you! There seems to be many variables in play here–Set To/Scale To in Premiere…Center Crop/Scale Entire Image in Resolve–all in conjunction with what frame size a clip is vs. timeline resolution + repo information. Whew! I wonder if there’s a way to condense these things into a flowchart or some easy-to-reference document. I understand the concepts you’ve brought into this series, but is there a method of gathering and connecting these variables for when we find ourselves in these situations during a session?


    • David H
      Member

      This is great info, Patrick, thank you! There seems to be many variables in play here–Set To/Scale To in Premiere…Center Crop/Scale Entire Image in Resolve–all in conjunction with what frame size a clip is vs. timeline resolution + repo information. Whew! I wonder if there’s a way to condense these things into a flowchart or some easy-to-reference document. I understand the concepts you’ve brought into this series, but is there a method of gathering and connecting these variables for when we find ourselves in these situations during a session?


    • David H
      Member

      This is great info, Patrick, thank you! There seems to be many variables in play here–Set To/Scale To in Premiere…Center Crop/Scale Entire Image in Resolve–all in conjunction with what frame size a clip is vs. timeline resolution + repo information. Whew! I wonder if there’s a way to condense these things into a flowchart or some easy-to-reference document. I understand the concepts you’ve brought into this series, but is there a method of gathering and connecting these variables for when we find ourselves in these situations during a session?


    • EBRAHIM A
      Member

      Thank you Patrick !!

      I’ve been using a slightly different approach with Premiere to Resolve Roundtriping:

      1- Create a new timeline in Premiere and name it (For Grading)
      2- Select all the clips, right click and remove all effects
      3- Clean the timeline and remove unnecessary clips and audio
      4- Export XML to Resolve
      5- Import it, grade it, and export it back to Premiere using the available Premiere Pro preset
      6- Import back to Premiere the graded XML and clips
      7- Copy & Paste the graded clips over the old clips and align them together
      8- Copy & Paste Attributes from the old clips to the new graded clips

      Although it is a little bit lengthy but it saves me from any XML related issue, and it’s very useful when you have VFX work in your project and you want to do the final export from Premiere Pro.


    • EBRAHIM A
      Member

      Thank you Patrick !!

      I’ve been using a slightly different approach with Premiere to Resolve Roundtriping:

      1- Create a new timeline in Premiere and name it (For Grading)
      2- Select all the clips, right click and remove all effects
      3- Clean the timeline and remove unnecessary clips and audio
      4- Export XML to Resolve
      5- Import it, grade it, and export it back to Premiere using the available Premiere Pro preset
      6- Import back to Premiere the graded XML and clips
      7- Copy & Paste the graded clips over the old clips and align them together
      8- Copy & Paste Attributes from the old clips to the new graded clips

      Although it is a little bit lengthy but it saves me from any XML related issue, and it’s very useful when you have VFX work in your project and you want to do the final export from Premiere Pro.


    • EBRAHIM A
      Member

      Thank you Patrick !!

      I’ve been using a slightly different approach with Premiere to Resolve Roundtriping:

      1- Create a new timeline in Premiere and name it (For Grading)
      2- Select all the clips, right click and remove all effects
      3- Clean the timeline and remove unnecessary clips and audio
      4- Export XML to Resolve
      5- Import it, grade it, and export it back to Premiere using the available Premiere Pro preset
      6- Import back to Premiere the graded XML and clips
      7- Copy & Paste the graded clips over the old clips and align them together
      8- Copy & Paste Attributes from the old clips to the new graded clips

      Although it is a little bit lengthy but it saves me from any XML related issue, and it’s very useful when you have VFX work in your project and you want to do the final export from Premiere Pro.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I’ve tried – but the variables keep piling up! Just read the thread below this one where Grey applies this to non-16:9 aspect ratios.

      In the end, there’s going to be a certain level of brute-force’ness to this until:

      a) Team Adobe decides to update their XML language and does the necessary math to translate into and out of their X/Y numbering space.

      or

      b) We can convince editors to stop using the ‘Scale to’ feature… which will require Adobe to offer a default ‘Set to Frame Size on Insert / Overwrite’. Otherwise the annoyance of having to manually ‘Set to’ will keep editors in mixed frame size projects from moving off the ‘Scale to’ workflow.

      or

      c) Editors move off Premiere and start adopting Resolve


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I’ve tried – but the variables keep piling up! Just read the thread below this one where Grey applies this to non-16:9 aspect ratios.

      In the end, there’s going to be a certain level of brute-force’ness to this until:

      a) Team Adobe decides to update their XML language and does the necessary math to translate into and out of their X/Y numbering space.

      or

      b) We can convince editors to stop using the ‘Scale to’ feature… which will require Adobe to offer a default ‘Set to Frame Size on Insert / Overwrite’. Otherwise the annoyance of having to manually ‘Set to’ will keep editors in mixed frame size projects from moving off the ‘Scale to’ workflow.

      or

      c) Editors move off Premiere and start adopting Resolve


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I’ve tried – but the variables keep piling up! Just read the thread below this one where Grey applies this to non-16:9 aspect ratios.

      In the end, there’s going to be a certain level of brute-force’ness to this until:

      a) Team Adobe decides to update their XML language and does the necessary math to translate into and out of their X/Y numbering space.

      or

      b) We can convince editors to stop using the ‘Scale to’ feature… which will require Adobe to offer a default ‘Set to Frame Size on Insert / Overwrite’. Otherwise the annoyance of having to manually ‘Set to’ will keep editors in mixed frame size projects from moving off the ‘Scale to’ workflow.

      or

      c) Editors move off Premiere and start adopting Resolve


    • David H
      Member

      I have done this as well rendering at source size. It’s kind of a PITA, but it does work effectively especially for shorter timelines (less copy and paste attributes). The method I used to see which clips had attributes changes (without having to squint to see that little FX box on the clips) is to set one graded clip at 50% opacity then copy/paste that attribute to the rest of the graded clips. When done, remove the opacity attribute from all graded clips.


    • David H
      Member

      I have done this as well rendering at source size. It’s kind of a PITA, but it does work effectively especially for shorter timelines (less copy and paste attributes). The method I used to see which clips had attributes changes (without having to squint to see that little FX box on the clips) is to set one graded clip at 50% opacity then copy/paste that attribute to the rest of the graded clips. When done, remove the opacity attribute from all graded clips.


    • David H
      Member

      I have done this as well rendering at source size. It’s kind of a PITA, but it does work effectively especially for shorter timelines (less copy and paste attributes). The method I used to see which clips had attributes changes (without having to squint to see that little FX box on the clips) is to set one graded clip at 50% opacity then copy/paste that attribute to the rest of the graded clips. When done, remove the opacity attribute from all graded clips.


    • Tyler H
      Participant

      This is a very helpful series. I would love to have something this in-depth on Avid Media Composer > Resolve (unless there already is one – I’m still going through all the vids).


    • Tyler H
      Participant

      This is a very helpful series. I would love to have something this in-depth on Avid Media Composer > Resolve (unless there already is one – I’m still going through all the vids).


    • Tyler H
      Participant

      This is a very helpful series. I would love to have something this in-depth on Avid Media Composer > Resolve (unless there already is one – I’m still going through all the vids).


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I haven’t done something like this in Avid yet. I really need to get my license updated and start documenting my Avid roundtrip workflow. Thanks for reminding me.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I haven’t done something like this in Avid yet. I really need to get my license updated and start documenting my Avid roundtrip workflow. Thanks for reminding me.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      I haven’t done something like this in Avid yet. I really need to get my license updated and start documenting my Avid roundtrip workflow. Thanks for reminding me.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      This is a solid roundtrip checklist. You may want to watch a few of the “In the Shadow of Giants” Insights from that conform nightmare. I followed the same basic routine you outline here – and it was a disaster… partially because of these Input Sizing problems. Partially because of a host of other problems that don’t get captured by the XML.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      This is a solid roundtrip checklist. You may want to watch a few of the “In the Shadow of Giants” Insights from that conform nightmare. I followed the same basic routine you outline here – and it was a disaster… partially because of these Input Sizing problems. Partially because of a host of other problems that don’t get captured by the XML.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      This is a solid roundtrip checklist. You may want to watch a few of the “In the Shadow of Giants” Insights from that conform nightmare. I followed the same basic routine you outline here – and it was a disaster… partially because of these Input Sizing problems. Partially because of a host of other problems that don’t get captured by the XML.


    • Seth Goldin
      Participant

      Wonderful! Extremely helpful! The resizing issues from Premiere to Resolve had always perplexed me, and I wasn’t sure how to figure out a bulletproof workflow. Thank you!


    • Seth Goldin
      Participant

      Wonderful! Extremely helpful! The resizing issues from Premiere to Resolve had always perplexed me, and I wasn’t sure how to figure out a bulletproof workflow. Thank you!


    • Seth Goldin
      Participant

      Wonderful! Extremely helpful! The resizing issues from Premiere to Resolve had always perplexed me, and I wasn’t sure how to figure out a bulletproof workflow. Thank you!


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      Keep in mind, with the right mix of mis-matched formats and a particularly industrious editor who changes their habits every day… it’s possible to find yourself in a situation where *something* needs to be eye-matched. So technically, there is no bulletproof solution. But yes, once you understand what’s going on, the perplexing becomes manageable.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      Keep in mind, with the right mix of mis-matched formats and a particularly industrious editor who changes their habits every day… it’s possible to find yourself in a situation where *something* needs to be eye-matched. So technically, there is no bulletproof solution. But yes, once you understand what’s going on, the perplexing becomes manageable.


    • Patrick Inhofer
      Guest

      Keep in mind, with the right mix of mis-matched formats and a particularly industrious editor who changes their habits every day… it’s possible to find yourself in a situation where *something* needs to be eye-matched. So technically, there is no bulletproof solution. But yes, once you understand what’s going on, the perplexing becomes manageable.


    • Scott Stacy
      Guest

      Patrick… This series is amazing. A lot of work went into it. I come back to it often to refresh my memory and to restore my sanity. Thanks!


    • Scott Stacy
      Guest

      Patrick… This series is amazing. A lot of work went into it. I come back to it often to refresh my memory and to restore my sanity. Thanks!


    • Scott Stacy
      Guest

      Patrick… This series is amazing. A lot of work went into it. I come back to it often to refresh my memory and to restore my sanity. Thanks!


    • Dexter G
      Guest

      Interesting and informative. Thank you!

      One question on the easy ease issue. I tried to add an ease in Resolve after importing the XML, but it wouldn’t let me. Is this a bug? Anything I can do to allow Resolve 15 to change the XML keyframes from linear to ease in?


    • Dexter G
      Guest

      Interesting and informative. Thank you!

      One question on the easy ease issue. I tried to add an ease in Resolve after importing the XML, but it wouldn’t let me. Is this a bug? Anything I can do to allow Resolve 15 to change the XML keyframes from linear to ease in?


    • Dexter G
      Guest

      Interesting and informative. Thank you!

      One question on the easy ease issue. I tried to add an ease in Resolve after importing the XML, but it wouldn’t let me. Is this a bug? Anything I can do to allow Resolve 15 to change the XML keyframes from linear to ease in?


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      You’re welcome!


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      You’re welcome!


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      You’re welcome!


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      If you open the keyframe editor on the Edit Page then you can choose your keyframes to change the interpolation. Just be aware, unlike Adobe, BMD easy ease doesn’t match zoom and position easing, so you’ll get weird easy eases on resizing animations that include zoom + XY repositioning.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      If you open the keyframe editor on the Edit Page then you can choose your keyframes to change the interpolation. Just be aware, unlike Adobe, BMD easy ease doesn’t match zoom and position easing, so you’ll get weird easy eases on resizing animations that include zoom + XY repositioning.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      If you open the keyframe editor on the Edit Page then you can choose your keyframes to change the interpolation. Just be aware, unlike Adobe, BMD easy ease doesn’t match zoom and position easing, so you’ll get weird easy eases on resizing animations that include zoom + XY repositioning.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      One more thing: I haven’t checked the most recent version of Premiere, but with CC 2019 it stopped exporting XY coordinates in its FCP XMLs. We made Adobe aware of the bug but it hadn’t been fixed as of a few weeks ago. So matching those repositions is a total eye job, right now.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      One more thing: I haven’t checked the most recent version of Premiere, but with CC 2019 it stopped exporting XY coordinates in its FCP XMLs. We made Adobe aware of the bug but it hadn’t been fixed as of a few weeks ago. So matching those repositions is a total eye job, right now.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      One more thing: I haven’t checked the most recent version of Premiere, but with CC 2019 it stopped exporting XY coordinates in its FCP XMLs. We made Adobe aware of the bug but it hadn’t been fixed as of a few weeks ago. So matching those repositions is a total eye job, right now.


    • Scott A
      Guest

      Hey Guys! So a basic fundamental question that I see all over the forums but can’t seem to find a DEFINITIVE answer. When working with say UHD footage in an HD timeline (and delivering final render in HD) Should I be working in Scale entire image to fit or center crop with no resizing?

      I believe “scale” is fine because I am delivering HD BUT if I do a repo to match the editors cut then aren’t I zooming in on HD footage now? Also sometimes I need to send things over to the graphics dept at full frame and source resolution. What I have been doing is making a copy (removing all sizing done in the inspector) going to deliver page and rendering an “individual clip” and checking the “at source resolution” button. I just wanted to confirm that this workflow is valid.

      Where I really see an issue is when working inside a fusion clip. As you may know, fusion/compound clips default to timeline resolution when made. In my case almost always HD, so when I go into the fusion comp I have already lost resolution (again this is fine if delivering HD) but if I want to send that new fusion comp to graphics at source resolution I cannot.

      A definitive answer on how to handle this workflow would be great. As Marc Wielage commonly states:; when delivering 4K work in a 4K timeline (or at least change it at the end before render) SO is that the workaround? Before I render any fusion comp do I change my timeline to UHD? And does scale to fit effectively down rez the clip?

      (Paul Saccone recently responded and said yes scale image scales it down to HD resolution! So whenever doing repo-ing are you changing that clip to center crop)

      Thank you all for your great help!!!! I am sure this is a common question


    • Scott A
      Guest

      Hey Guys! So a basic fundamental question that I see all over the forums but can’t seem to find a DEFINITIVE answer. When working with say UHD footage in an HD timeline (and delivering final render in HD) Should I be working in Scale entire image to fit or center crop with no resizing?

      I believe “scale” is fine because I am delivering HD BUT if I do a repo to match the editors cut then aren’t I zooming in on HD footage now? Also sometimes I need to send things over to the graphics dept at full frame and source resolution. What I have been doing is making a copy (removing all sizing done in the inspector) going to deliver page and rendering an “individual clip” and checking the “at source resolution” button. I just wanted to confirm that this workflow is valid.

      Where I really see an issue is when working inside a fusion clip. As you may know, fusion/compound clips default to timeline resolution when made. In my case almost always HD, so when I go into the fusion comp I have already lost resolution (again this is fine if delivering HD) but if I want to send that new fusion comp to graphics at source resolution I cannot.

      A definitive answer on how to handle this workflow would be great. As Marc Wielage commonly states:; when delivering 4K work in a 4K timeline (or at least change it at the end before render) SO is that the workaround? Before I render any fusion comp do I change my timeline to UHD? And does scale to fit effectively down rez the clip?

      (Paul Saccone recently responded and said yes scale image scales it down to HD resolution! So whenever doing repo-ing are you changing that clip to center crop)

      Thank you all for your great help!!!! I am sure this is a common question


    • Scott A
      Guest

      Hey Guys! So a basic fundamental question that I see all over the forums but can’t seem to find a DEFINITIVE answer. When working with say UHD footage in an HD timeline (and delivering final render in HD) Should I be working in Scale entire image to fit or center crop with no resizing?

      I believe “scale” is fine because I am delivering HD BUT if I do a repo to match the editors cut then aren’t I zooming in on HD footage now? Also sometimes I need to send things over to the graphics dept at full frame and source resolution. What I have been doing is making a copy (removing all sizing done in the inspector) going to deliver page and rendering an “individual clip” and checking the “at source resolution” button. I just wanted to confirm that this workflow is valid.

      Where I really see an issue is when working inside a fusion clip. As you may know, fusion/compound clips default to timeline resolution when made. In my case almost always HD, so when I go into the fusion comp I have already lost resolution (again this is fine if delivering HD) but if I want to send that new fusion comp to graphics at source resolution I cannot.

      A definitive answer on how to handle this workflow would be great. As Marc Wielage commonly states:; when delivering 4K work in a 4K timeline (or at least change it at the end before render) SO is that the workaround? Before I render any fusion comp do I change my timeline to UHD? And does scale to fit effectively down rez the clip?

      (Paul Saccone recently responded and said yes scale image scales it down to HD resolution! So whenever doing repo-ing are you changing that clip to center crop)

      Thank you all for your great help!!!! I am sure this is a common question


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      First: I STRONGLY recommend you read Chapter 9 of the Resolve User Manual. It’s titled, “Image Sizing and Resolution Independence”. It deals precisely with these questions. Specifically, Page 206 (August 2018 pdf), “Using High Resolution Media in Lower Resolution Timelines” is your definitive answer – no matter what anyone else says.

      On Page 210, is your answer about Fusion comps. It turns out the Transform node maintains resolution independence while the Resize node breaks Resolve’s resolution independence and rasterizes the image to the size you specify.

      On Export you do NOT need to removing sizing info in the Inspector. Just set ‘render at source resolution’ and enable ‘disable edit and input sizing’ in the Advanced export settings on the Deliver page for clean UHD-sized color graded plates for VFX.

      Make sense?


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      First: I STRONGLY recommend you read Chapter 9 of the Resolve User Manual. It’s titled, “Image Sizing and Resolution Independence”. It deals precisely with these questions. Specifically, Page 206 (August 2018 pdf), “Using High Resolution Media in Lower Resolution Timelines” is your definitive answer – no matter what anyone else says.

      On Page 210, is your answer about Fusion comps. It turns out the Transform node maintains resolution independence while the Resize node breaks Resolve’s resolution independence and rasterizes the image to the size you specify.

      On Export you do NOT need to removing sizing info in the Inspector. Just set ‘render at source resolution’ and enable ‘disable edit and input sizing’ in the Advanced export settings on the Deliver page for clean UHD-sized color graded plates for VFX.

      Make sense?


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      First: I STRONGLY recommend you read Chapter 9 of the Resolve User Manual. It’s titled, “Image Sizing and Resolution Independence”. It deals precisely with these questions. Specifically, Page 206 (August 2018 pdf), “Using High Resolution Media in Lower Resolution Timelines” is your definitive answer – no matter what anyone else says.

      On Page 210, is your answer about Fusion comps. It turns out the Transform node maintains resolution independence while the Resize node breaks Resolve’s resolution independence and rasterizes the image to the size you specify.

      On Export you do NOT need to removing sizing info in the Inspector. Just set ‘render at source resolution’ and enable ‘disable edit and input sizing’ in the Advanced export settings on the Deliver page for clean UHD-sized color graded plates for VFX.

      Make sense?


    • frank g
      Guest

      Hey im working with transcodes in premiere that are at 1920×1080. The LOG footage is 4k and and 6k. I’m working with multiple timelines are 1:1. 4:5. and 16:9.

      I did a bunch of position key framing and blowups in premiere. Once i bring the XML into resolve the scaling is messed up. I feel like input sizing may help me here… Non of my clips are “scaled to frame size” so I’m good there.

      But moving over to larger footage is crippling me…


    • frank g
      Guest

      Hey im working with transcodes in premiere that are at 1920×1080. The LOG footage is 4k and and 6k. I’m working with multiple timelines are 1:1. 4:5. and 16:9.

      I did a bunch of position key framing and blowups in premiere. Once i bring the XML into resolve the scaling is messed up. I feel like input sizing may help me here… Non of my clips are “scaled to frame size” so I’m good there.

      But moving over to larger footage is crippling me…


    • frank g
      Guest

      Hey im working with transcodes in premiere that are at 1920×1080. The LOG footage is 4k and and 6k. I’m working with multiple timelines are 1:1. 4:5. and 16:9.

      I did a bunch of position key framing and blowups in premiere. Once i bring the XML into resolve the scaling is messed up. I feel like input sizing may help me here… Non of my clips are “scaled to frame size” so I’m good there.

      But moving over to larger footage is crippling me…


    • David Willis
      Guest

      Where can I find the Resolve User Manual? None of the documents on the training site have this name. The two most likely candidates, “The Beginner’s Guide to DaVinci Resolve 16” and “Advanced Editing with DaVinci Resolve 15,” do not contain any such chapters nor the phrases “image sizing” or “resolution independence.”

      Documentation seems to be something of a struggle for BMD…


    • David Willis
      Guest

      Where can I find the Resolve User Manual? None of the documents on the training site have this name. The two most likely candidates, “The Beginner’s Guide to DaVinci Resolve 16” and “Advanced Editing with DaVinci Resolve 15,” do not contain any such chapters nor the phrases “image sizing” or “resolution independence.”

      Documentation seems to be something of a struggle for BMD…


    • David Willis
      Guest

      Where can I find the Resolve User Manual? None of the documents on the training site have this name. The two most likely candidates, “The Beginner’s Guide to DaVinci Resolve 16” and “Advanced Editing with DaVinci Resolve 15,” do not contain any such chapters nor the phrases “image sizing” or “resolution independence.”

      Documentation seems to be something of a struggle for BMD…


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      Hi David – With DaVinci Resolve running go to the menu:

      Help > “DaVinci Resolve Reference Manual
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3ee3f697f995319af2819ecfcea345b561759ab5e1c4baf079a0c7cd62ffe940.png

      The reference manual is, at current count, 3,300+ pages long! So I always search it by phrase if I’m looking for something specific. Or, go through the Table of Contents to find a general topic you want to know more about. Then at each section within the manual there’s usually a more detailed ToC for each section, to help you hone in and what you want to find.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      Hi David – With DaVinci Resolve running go to the menu:

      Help > “DaVinci Resolve Reference Manual
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3ee3f697f995319af2819ecfcea345b561759ab5e1c4baf079a0c7cd62ffe940.png

      The reference manual is, at current count, 3,300+ pages long! So I always search it by phrase if I’m looking for something specific. Or, go through the Table of Contents to find a general topic you want to know more about. Then at each section within the manual there’s usually a more detailed ToC for each section, to help you hone in and what you want to find.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      Hi David – With DaVinci Resolve running go to the menu:

      Help > “DaVinci Resolve Reference Manual
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3ee3f697f995319af2819ecfcea345b561759ab5e1c4baf079a0c7cd62ffe940.png

      The reference manual is, at current count, 3,300+ pages long! So I always search it by phrase if I’m looking for something specific. Or, go through the Table of Contents to find a general topic you want to know more about. Then at each section within the manual there’s usually a more detailed ToC for each section, to help you hone in and what you want to find.


    • David Willis
      Guest

      lol I did not think to look in the application help menu. Thanks!


    • David Willis
      Guest

      lol I did not think to look in the application help menu. Thanks!


    • David Willis
      Guest

      lol I did not think to look in the application help menu. Thanks!


    • Daniel Silverman
      Guest

      Thanks Patrick for this Premiere Pro Detective series! I really appreciate all of your hard work. Saved me hours of resizing. Love doing things the right way!


    • Daniel Silverman
      Guest

      Thanks Patrick for this Premiere Pro Detective series! I really appreciate all of your hard work. Saved me hours of resizing. Love doing things the right way!


    • Daniel Silverman
      Guest

      Thanks Patrick for this Premiere Pro Detective series! I really appreciate all of your hard work. Saved me hours of resizing. Love doing things the right way!


    • Eric L
      Guest

      In 2021, this workflow appears to only work if the Resolve timeline is also 1920×1080. 99% of the shows we work on are cut at 1080, but we finish at 2160 UHD. The Center Crop with no re-sizing settings makes no difference in this situation. In fact, the XML passes along the edit sizing as 50% (.50) for all clips that have not been resized. This needs to be reset to 100% (1.00) for every clip in the film intended to play at it’s original size. Unfortunately, there is no quick “select all”way to do this, and preserve the sizing of the clips that are intended to be resized. So it must be done one clip at a time. For this reason, we recommend to our clients that they use Scale to Frame Size when the workflow involves an Online of higher res source destined for a UHD finish. We would much rather manually adjust the framing of a selected group of clips (which we make them document) than have to resize every single clip in the film. So, like most things in video editing, sometimes it works as expected, and sometimes it doesn’t.


    • Eric L
      Guest

      In 2021, this workflow appears to only work if the Resolve timeline is also 1920×1080. 99% of the shows we work on are cut at 1080, but we finish at 2160 UHD. The Center Crop with no re-sizing settings makes no difference in this situation. In fact, the XML passes along the edit sizing as 50% (.50) for all clips that have not been resized. This needs to be reset to 100% (1.00) for every clip in the film intended to play at it’s original size. Unfortunately, there is no quick “select all”way to do this, and preserve the sizing of the clips that are intended to be resized. So it must be done one clip at a time. For this reason, we recommend to our clients that they use Scale to Frame Size when the workflow involves an Online of higher res source destined for a UHD finish. We would much rather manually adjust the framing of a selected group of clips (which we make them document) than have to resize every single clip in the film. So, like most things in video editing, sometimes it works as expected, and sometimes it doesn’t.


    • Eric L
      Guest

      In 2021, this workflow appears to only work if the Resolve timeline is also 1920×1080. 99% of the shows we work on are cut at 1080, but we finish at 2160 UHD. The Center Crop with no re-sizing settings makes no difference in this situation. In fact, the XML passes along the edit sizing as 50% (.50) for all clips that have not been resized. This needs to be reset to 100% (1.00) for every clip in the film intended to play at it’s original size. Unfortunately, there is no quick “select all”way to do this, and preserve the sizing of the clips that are intended to be resized. So it must be done one clip at a time. For this reason, we recommend to our clients that they use Scale to Frame Size when the workflow involves an Online of higher res source destined for a UHD finish. We would much rather manually adjust the framing of a selected group of clips (which we make them document) than have to resize every single clip in the film. So, like most things in video editing, sometimes it works as expected, and sometimes it doesn’t.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      Eric – Thanks for the update. This Insight was *definitely* done with 1080p workflows in mind. I’ll take another run at this to see if I can figure out any other alternatives. But your recommendation definitely makes sense.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      Eric – Thanks for the update. This Insight was *definitely* done with 1080p workflows in mind. I’ll take another run at this to see if I can figure out any other alternatives. But your recommendation definitely makes sense.


    • Pat Inhofer
      Guest

      Eric – Thanks for the update. This Insight was *definitely* done with 1080p workflows in mind. I’ll take another run at this to see if I can figure out any other alternatives. But your recommendation definitely makes sense.

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