Elsewhere On The Web: Netflix Recommended Displays (and more)

November 26, 2021

This series returns with stories on Netflix recommended displays; being a better colorist; color harmonies; and note-taking.


Series

Valuable color grading insights that aren’t on Mixing Light


This Insight is part of a Mixing Light series rounding up useful non-Mixing Light articles, tutorials, and podcasts. They are culled from my TaoOfColor.com weekly Color Grading Newsletter (click through to read the most recent edition and subscribe). In this series, I gather non-Mixing Light stories that I think our members will find interesting. Craft, workflow, technique, gear – if I think an item published in the Newsletter deserves special mention and recognition then I put them in this series. Enjoy!


About these six items

It’s been a long time since I did a roundup of content from elsewhere on the web. These insights are all culled from the first 9 months of 2021 stories that I shared in my weekly newsletter.


1. Netflix Recommended Client Displays

In this document, we lay out possible scenarios and solutions, as well as some of their risks and benefits, to help inform on what resources may be available and fit within our technical and security guidance. To be clear, this is not a requirements document nor is it an official endorsement of any solutions referred to. This information is solely provided to engage collaboration and discussion and to share what we know.

-Netflix Partner Help Center

Last updated in August of 2020, this Netflix document is still relevant today. The helpful part is that the specific hardware recommendations are categorized into HDR (high dynamic range) and SDR (standard dynamic range) workflows. Plus, reference or review viewing environments. If you’re looking at purchasing a display for color grading, this is a good place to start and see what category Netflix thinks your display falls into.

This document was initially published to assist creatives in work-from-home situations during pandemic lockdowns. It also does a great job summarizing calibration software, client review approval solutions for HDR and SDR material (both for live streaming sessions and ‘non-live’ situations), professional file transfer software, and general data management security considerations.

If nothing else, I recommend scanning this document for ideas you may have missed and might want to consider. Finally, there’s a sidebar of ‘related content’. There’s plenty of worthwhile additional reading on the subject of color-critical workflows and setups.

You may want to visit this page for the additional ‘related articles’ on the subject of work-from-home setups and color-critical workflows.

Member Content

Sorry... the rest of this content is for members only. You'll need to login or sign up to continue (we hope you do!).

Membership options
Member Login

Comments

Homepage Forums Elsewhere On The Web: Netflix Recommended Displays (and more)

  • This topic has 1 reply, 1 voice, and was last updated 12 months ago by James L.
Viewing 0 reply threads

    • James L
      Guest

      The Resolve deliver page advice given in #3 on Apple Color Management is 100% wrong — BT.1886 graded files tagged as REC709-A yielding a 1-1-1 tag will not result in a faithful rendering in color managed applications. The image will be interpreted as if the EOTF was roughly a 1.96 power curve, and the end result in any color managed app for display on mobile device or computer screen (all of which are nearly always 2.2) is that the image will appear brighter and less saturated relative to its appearance on a BT.1886 display.
      It’s an easy thing to test out and see for yourself.
      The only working method I’ve found for grading in BT.1886 and delivering to web/mobile is described in detail in this video:

      YouTube video

Viewing 0 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Hundreds of Free Tutorials

Get full access to our entire library of 900+ color tutorials for an entire week!


Start Your Free Trial
Loading...