Commercial Workflow : Labeling And Ingest

Commercial Workflow : Labeling And Ingest

February 10, 2014

Have you ever wondered how other colorists organise and run their jobs? Now is your chance to see a real commercial workflow in action.


Series

Commercial Workflow

When working on 3 or 4 grading projects a day you have to learn to be organised and build a rock solid pipeline so you have no day to day surprises when conforming and rendering.

I have to admit I was terrible at this when I joined Smoke and Mirrors but thanks to the amazing team there we’ve built a great structured workflow. Of course I’d love to share this with you guys!

The first step is to building a structure and naming convention that everyone knows, uses, and understands.

As my old woodwork teacher used to say to me. “There is a place for everything and everything is in its place”.

I didn’t realise it at the time, but when you think about how many hundreds of DPX files there are in 30seconds of footage it makes a lot of sense!

This is the first of a series based on a complete start to finish workflow in the commercial world. It’s a lot of information to take in, so I would rate this as an intermediate level insight that assumes that you know Resolve well and would like to know more about this specific workflow.

I’m sure you will have questions and I’d love to hear how you organise your jobs and workflow!

– Dan

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Comments

6 thoughts on “Commercial Workflow : Labeling And Ingest”

  1. Hey Dan this great! We are using a C100 at work and I have to trans code the footage to ProRes Lt and I keep a copy of the footage and I give a copy to our editor and then he sends me back an edl from Premiere. Sense I am at a ProRes already do I need to do anything else within my work flow

  2. Thanks for sharing this, Dan. Can you expand on what you do after the DPX files have been rendered out – do you then import the DPX files and use ‘Reconform from bin(s)’? I’ve been trying it and I’m getting a lot of clips coming back in as offline.

  3. Thanks for the video, Dan.

    I’ve heard that this is the standard workflow from many of the big post houses and I really like the idea of consolidated media for several reasons. However, won’t it create all new file names and require a new conform? Which in turn would actually add more time to the process overall?

  4. Is it customary to ask a client to wrangle their media, so it’s ready to import as a consolidated project? Can we ask them to prepare the files using this folder structure, send project source files conformed to one codec, and send source media cut with 50 frame handles? Is this something anyone does, does it risk quality to have a client do it, or is it bad form to ask?

    I just found the Conform or Pre-Conform Lessons, but any additional info would be welcomed. I feel like having the client consolidate their media using this outline is a happy medium between a preconformed, baked edit and having them send a hard drive for me to consolidate from. I guess budget and time is the main factor.

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