Target Showreel Audience

Showreel 2016 – Who Is Your Target Audience?

February 18, 2016

It's time to cut your reel and Dan shares his advice on his Showreel 2016


Showreel 2016 – Who Is Your Target Audience?

We are all a little quieter than the pre-holiday rush and it’s time to get all the juicy new work onto our websites and make a new showreel 2016.

I’d like to share with you both my new showreel and my experiences creating it both good and bad.

I fell into a trap that I didn’t even realise when I was getting my new reel cut by one of the most talented editors I have ever met.

I gave him all the footage that I was most proud of and thought would make a good reel.

I cut all the “Old” material and added in all my latest and greatest.

So you can play along at home I’ve attached that very first draft of my new showreel.

I still love it but as you’ll find out a little later on I made a few fatal mistakes.

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26 thoughts on “Showreel 2016 – Who Is Your Target Audience?”

    1. i too wonder about this and how larger clients feel, especially when shown the original log negative. I used to think it was neat to show the entire process, but recent discussions has made me reconsider. Is this ‘strategy” limited to lower end clientele where they may not be as familiar with what can be done w color as an agency or experienced producerdirector? As mentioned in a previous article, does including those beforeafter in a reel limit its appeal to less experienced lower budget productions?

      You mentioned these clients arent interested in the footage, but more what you did and if it is close to what they are looking for. Is showing beforeafter hurting your chances at larger clients, if that mentality is rampant? Ive always judged a clips quality THEN my grade before considering it for my reel, when it sounds like this is backwards.

      1. As I mentioned in my two part Building a Demo Reel Insights, Before / After Reels are educational. They’re for clients who don’t actually know what color grading is about. You’ll teach them everything they need to know in 2 minutes. For clients who understand color grading, swipe reels are unimpressive and they want to see your best work.

        Ideally, they want to see precisely the same kind of images that they want you to create for them.

        So if your clients tend to be brand-new to color grading, the Before / After is the way to go (it’s the only Reel I had for 6 years). Otherwise, the best-of-your-best Beauty reel is the way to go.

      2. I think doing _very limited_ before & afters are fine, but I don’t think log/corrected comparisons are fair to the DP. I don’t mind a “base correction” / final correction comparison, particularly if it’s got 20 nodes and you wipe each one on very quickly, and it’s a huge difference between what was actually shot. And I’d get permission from the client.

        1. While I understand, I’m trying to attract clients with a reel, not DPs. While DPs can lead to clients, a DP has his own reel to show of their work, right? While I agree if simply using a color managed system, log transforms are nothing special. However, if I grade from LOG, I consider that my work, even if it is taking it to a normalized look, which may be part of the way towards the clients ‘look’, as opposed to slapping an Arri-provided Transform LUT (or similar). THIS is where I’m split between what is best for me and respecting the DPs and others I work w.

  1. Frustrating thing is neither of the 2016 reels play on my Galaxy Tab II tablet. Whatever you’ve got in that mp4 wrapper isn’t beloved by this thing. The 2015 reel plays fine. Ah well … have to take time at the studio then.

  2. My 2016 reel http://www.colorist.se/Colorist-Reel-2016 and my 2015 reel http://www.colorist.se/Colorist-Reel-2015
    I kind of like my old one better but didn’t want to use any old stuff in my new reel, trying to just keep it fresh. Also I worked less in 2015 (for 2016 reel) because I was on parental leave from May so the 2016 reel has less material. What do you think all new footage to show of or mix all years of work? thanks for all the great tutorials it keeps me trying new stuff all the time. / Martin

    1. I personally advocate updating your Beauty Reel every year. But there’s no way I’m going to only include the material from just the prior year.

      Check out my 2-Part’er on this: https://mixinglight.com/portfolio/how-to-build-a-color-correction-demo-reel/

      You Reels should always include the Best of your Best. When updating, take a look at the Best work you’ve done (that represents the direction you want you career to go) and it needs to knock out of the Reel work that isn’t as good. As the years pass along, your Reel is always getting better and it doesn’t matter if some shots are 6 years old—if those shots are so good they stand the test of time, so be it.

  3. Hi Dan,

    We have an account with my company so my name is not Alexandre Domingue. It’s Charles Boileau…

    Here is my reel: http://post-moderne.com/portfolio/demo-2014-charles-boileau-coloriste/
    I was curious to know why no before/after wipes? I’m kind of drifting towards having none also. Yet, I’ve seen demos with “full breakdown” of a look that look great. It’s very tedious to put together. Plus, I’m more of a narrative colorist so I don’t have allot of tricks to show. But that being said, I’m curious to get your take (and any others) on having no wipes.

  4. My position on before and after reels is that I don’t include any before at all.

    This may only be applicable to someone in the same kind of area / position as myself though.

    I work in a place called Soho in London and I think there is at least 30 other colorists in less than a square mile.

    With that in mind so much work flows through this area that all our clients are very educated in the world of grading and they also have quite a lot of budget reserved for grading. Normally in the $400 – $700 range.

    So for me my showreel isn’t actually about making bad footage looking good. It’s a boasting reel to show people nice projects that I’ve worked on that they should recognise.

    What clients look for first is a safe pair of hands to show that you have been trusted by other clients to deliver high end work.

    Big brands, big music videos or anything that would be memorable.

    I totally get that before and afters work but for me it’s a bit of a no no as clients assume that anyone working in this area is the top of their game and an expert in their filed.

    To give you an idea here is just some of the people that work right beside me!

    If you notice there is no before and afters either.

    http://www.moving-picture.com/advertising/mpc-colour/

    http://electrictheatre.tv/colour

    http://www.themill.com/what-we-do/7/colour

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